Monday, April 25, 2016

Seid Trips: Two Reservoir Ride

I knew through the week that the weather looked good for a Saturday ride. It's been a long time since I went out for an "epic" ride. Some time ago I plotted out a ride that would take me to someplace new and scenic. I decided to do that ride. Friday evening I prepped my bike. I got my clothes laid out along with the arm and leg warmers and a light jacket and put together the drinks and food I wanted to take with me. I got up Saturday morning ready to ride.
It was a bit cool, maybe in the high 40s when I started out. I felt good; I expected to feel a little tight and tired for the first ten miles. By then I start to warm up and can enjoy the ride. I traveled north on Round Barn Road, going under the 70 freeway overpass, and proceeding to SR 35. I then took that west to cross Route 1. At that point I began traveling on small, country roads. Each new segment seemed to be smaller and more pot-holed. After some miles making my way NW, to my surprise my GPS told me to make a left -- on to a gravel road. I wanted adventure! I must have traveled five or ten miles on gravel roads before getting back to paved roads and highways.
It was great to finally reach the first lake, Summit Lake Reservoir. The road bisected the easternmost part of the lake so that I had water on either side. When I reached the second reservoir, Prairie Creek Reservoir, I could tell it was much more of a recreational area with parks, beaches, and marinas.
I took in the scenery as I made my way around the northern tip of the lake and returned to the south to travel the western shores of the two reservoirs. I stopped at one point to have a rest and something to eat. I posted a selfie to FaceBook and then took a picture of my bike against the beauty of the lake and the sky.
At about the 70-mile point my legs began to cramp. I stopped along the highway (SR 38) just west of Hagerstown to rest a bit. I tried shaking and stretching. When I got back on the bike, my leg muscles would cramp again. I finally thought I should call family in case I just couldn't keep going. No answer. No answer. No answer. I kept trying to get back on the road. I walked my bike a few hundred yards to the top of the ascent. I got back on and began turning my legs a bit as I coasted. A little more and just a bit of twinging. I was in Hagerstown when my daughter tried calling. I sent her the text message through Siri: "I am in Hagerstown. I am doing ok."
I made it all the way home. I told my daughter I was glad no one answered their phones. I really wanted to be able to finish my ride. I didn't give up. 91 miles. A bit short of a century. But I planned for the adventure and not for the number of miles.
I remember thinking as I rode under 70. They call it a freeway. But riding my bike under my own power to go where I want to go is more of a free way to travel.